How consistent security reporting in government could prevent the next WannaCry exploit

Robert Schofield, a Senior Solutions Architect for NetCentrics, and Thomas Cook, a Senior Systems Engineer for NetCentrics, recently published an article in Cyber Defense Magazine. Titled How consistent security reporting in government could prevent the next WannaCry exploit, the article explores the concept of data aggregation as a means to improved cybersecurity in the federal space. Robert and Thomas explain that the abundance of tools results in an equal abundance of information, which isn’t always consistent when compared to data collected from other tools.

Cyber Weekly Roundup – April 6, 2018

ICYMI: Careful what you wish for—change and continuity in China’s cyber threats; Why North Korean Cyberwarfare is Likely to Intensify; Here comes the next round of encryption legislation; DHS says unauthorized Stingrays could be in D.C. area; and, Atlanta takes down water department website two weeks after cyber attack.

Cyber Weekly Roundup – March 30, 2018

ICYMI: City of Atlanta 2018 Ransomware Hack: What We Know and What You Can Learn From It; United States Cyber Command’s New Vision: What It Entails and Why It Matters; US mulls drafting gray-haired hackers during times of crisis; Under Armour says 150 million MyFitnessPal accounts breached; and, Microsoft’s Meltdown Patch Made Windows 7 PCs More Insecure.

Ransomware: playing an effective defense

In this final installment in our series on ransomware, we will discuss what you and your organization can do to protect yourself from the threat of ransomware and how to mitigate the damages, both financially and to your organizational reputation, if you find yourself the victim of an attack.

Ransomware: new markets and new possibilities

In the previous parts of this series, we explored the concepts underlying ransomware as well as some of the tactics and variations on basic ransom-based malware. Here in part IV, we will explore what makes ransomware an appealing enterprise for cybercriminals; as the title of part III indicates, the ransomware industry is booming.

The Booming Business of Ransomware

Once considered the domain of nation-state intelligence agencies, tech-savvy teenagers with too much time on their hands, and miscreants devoted to chaos and disorder, the development and deployment of malware has matured into a profitable business model – last year the cost of ransomware was estimated at $1 billion and a report sponsored by Malwarebytes estimated that more than 40% of those affected paid ransom demands.

To Pay or Not to Pay? Recovering from a Crypto-Ransomware Attack

Part 2 of a 2-part series on Crypto-ransomware By Andrew Paulette As discussed in Part I of this series, crypto-ransomware is quickly becoming the extortion tool of choice for cybercriminals. Even when an organization trains its employees to guard against social engineering, disables macros and configures ad-blockers, and takes an array of other steps to […]